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DRM is painful
buzzed, B&W
hairylunch
I tend to really like the Multnomah County Library. The central branch is beautiful, they've got a solid website, and they've got a lot of eBook options. But that's part of the problem too . . .

I recently read a blog post entitled Do We Still Need Dedicated Testers, and it reference a book called Humble Inquiry so I found out that the library has it digitally. I end up clicking to get the full text, and that's when I end up going down the rabbit hole . . . I had to:

  1. Log into the library and then click on the Full Download link . . .

  2. Log into ebrary, which meant another account (with different password requirements)

  3. There's a dialog then that asks if you're using a laptop, iOS, or Android. I was on the laptop, but wanted to put it on the iPad so I select iOS (and who knows why there isn't some auto detection here).

  4. Advanced the dialog, which says to install Bluefire Reader, so I get the iPad and do so.

  5. Launch Bluefire, which requires me to create yet another account, this time with Adobe for DRM

  6. Click the download link in my browser, which wants to download a file to use locally on the laptop.

  7. Repeat the above steps on the iPad (skipping the account creation, but still needing to log into three different accounts) and now I've finally got the thing on the iPad.

The process of getting the Kindle setup to work with the library was pretty painful too, and is still a bit painful in that once the book is checked out, you have to go to the Overdrive app to select the Kindle version, then go to Amazon's website to actually download it. It also seems a bit strange to be going to Amazon to return it when I checked it out via Overdrive.

Yay for digital formats allowing for easier portability of information, but man, DRM and all the various towers out there makes me wonder how non-tech oriented folks ever manage any of this . . .