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Reading
buzzed, B&W
hairylunch
After I finished Life of Pi, I then read Crichton's State of Fear. Pretty standard Crichton, with a good blend of science and fiction. This one is slightly more interesting in that he cites a lot of things in footnotes, while he comments upon global warming. Well, in fact, he attacks global warming, painting environmentalists as alarmists. I don't know enough about global warming to know if he's right or wrong, but it was definitely interesting seeing that view point.

I then read Truss' Eats, Shoots & Leaves. Let me just say she's quite the grammar Nazi. While bad punctuation and grammar drive me nuts in general (I often get distracted when I find a grammatical error, and lose focus for 30 seconds or so), I thought the bit on the Oxford comma was the most interesting, as I didn't realize there was a term for said comma. I personally am a big fan of the Oxford comma. I think it clarifies lists - it feels to me if it's not there that the last two items in the list go together. For example the sentence, "The colors were red, white and blue," seems to imply to me that white and blue go together, and then there was red.

Next I read Chbosky's The Perks of Being a Wallflower. This one was quite the entertaining reading. It's written as a series of letters from an awkward, high school freshman to some mystery person. It's a coming of age story, with a slight twist ending. I really liked it since it was so easy to see parts of me in the main character, Charlie, partly since I was somewhat similar to him in high school. I was more of an observer, than a participant. There's references to Teach for America, and lots of great books. Throughout the novel, Charlie is infatuated/in love/whatever with this girl Sam. Sam ends up getting duped by her jerk of a boyfriend, Craig, but Charlie doesn't make a move, and Sam knows that Charlie's attracted on some level. They have a conversation that goes like this:

"When that whole thing with Craig happened, what did you think?" She really wanted to know.
I said, "Well, I thought a lot of things. But mostly, I thought that your being sad was much more important to me than Craig not being your boyfriend anymore. And if it meant that I would never get to think of you that way, as long as you were happy, it was okay. That's when I realized that I really loved you."
She sat down on the floor with me. She spoke quiet.
"Charlie, don't you get it? I can't feel that. It's sweet and everything, but it's like your not even there sometimes. It's great that you can listen and be a shoulder to someone, but what about when someone doesn't need a shoulder. What if they need the arms or something like that? You can't just sit there and put everybody's lives ahead of yours and think that counts as love. You just can't. You have to do things."


The rest of the scene builds upon this. While it's not exactly a realistic dialogue for high school age kids, the underlying theme resonates with me.

The last book I read was Gibson's Mona Lisa Overdrive. While I really wanted to read Neuromancer and Count Zero, the library didn't have them, so I settled for Mona. Neuromancer is often cited as the first "cyberpunk" novel. Nothing too deep here, but good quality sci-fi. Unlike Pattern Recognition, this one is much harder sci-fi. I'm impressed by how futuristic the novel is, considering it was written in '88. And I still want to read Neuromancer.

I'm out of books at the moment, which is why I'm writing these superficial thoughts/reviews.

I think I missed Bride and Prejudice here in Helena. While I don't think it would compare to Bend it Like Beckham, the visuals in it looked stunning.

And I'm up way later than intended . . . again.

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I think I have a copy of Neuromancer and Count Zero I could send out to you.

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